Transportation

Forums 2016 Hikers Transportation

This topic contains 12 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Brian Tanzman 2 years, 8 months ago.

Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
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  • #435

    Tobias Nickel
    Participant

    I’m planning to hike the BFT northbound, leaving my car at the Ides Cove Trailhead. The obvious problem being how to get back to my car. I figure it won’t be too difficult to take public transit or hitch hike from Crescent City to Arcata. However, after that my intuition tells me that it gets problematic. Perhaps from Arcata I can hitch hike to Redding or Red Bluff? And then pay someone or try to catch a ride along the forest roads back to the trailhead? Or am I setting myself up for disaster here? How common is it to hitch hike in Northern California? I assume people in Northern CA are more trusting and willing to help and offer someone a ride than people here in Southern CA, though that may only be a stereotype?
    Alternatively, is there a shuttle service that caters to backpackers in the area? How widespread are lift and uber? I would welcome and appreciate any suggestions regarding transportation! Thank you!

    #441

    Mary Kwart
    Participant

    I personally would not leave my car at the Ides Cove trailhead for the time it would take to complete the BFT. Break ins are common at trailheads all over N. Calif. That being said, hitchhiking would be nearly impossible to the trailhead from any town. I corralled a friend to drive me to the trailhead and paid for gas. I also got someone to pick me up at the other end. I was stopped by wildfire closures outside the Siskiyou Wilderness and walked back out to the Bigfoot Highway to meet them. If you do leave your car at Ides Cove, I live in Ashland Oregon and if I am not hiking, I could take you part of the way back.

    #446

    Tobias Nickel
    Participant

    That’s too bad about the break ins. I have left my car at numerous trailheads for weeks at a time in the Sierra, Utah and Arizona. I have a pretty old car with a ton of stickers on it and I won’t leave anything valuable behind. Anyway, good to know.

    I live in San Diego, so I don’t have any contacts in Northern California (in fact, I have never been North of Lake Tahoe). However, I am very much intrigued by Northern CA and the Pacific Northwest in general. Thank you so much for the offer. I might reach out to you as my plans for the BFT become more defined!

    #448

    Tobias Nickel
    Participant

    And, yes, I am aware how prone this region is to wildfires, which is what I am most concerned about for this trip, especially because I am planning to thru-hike the BFT in October.

    #452

    Brian Tanzman
    Participant

    Hey, so don’t rely on this since I haven’t tried this yet, but in planning for my September hike this is what I’m looking at. Greyhound goes into Red Bluff, CA so that gets you fairly close. Instead of using the route drawn on the BFT maps to the Ides Cove trailhead I am looking at the north route on M22 that is also on the BFT map and covered by the text box. From Red Bluff to the trailhead it’s about 45 miles. Looking at Google Earth, the first 25 miles are paved and the remaining are gravel/dirt.

    While not ideal and I’m guessing pretty remote this isn’t that far and has to be possible. My plan is to hike south/east bound so I’ll be finishing at Ides Cove and basically will just walk to Red Bluff until I get a ride. It can’t be worse than 2 days of walking and I would think I’d at least catch a ride once I hit pavement.

    Starting this way doesn’t seem as enjoyable, but I thought I’d throw out another possibility.

    If someone sees anything wrong with the above, let me know!

    #453

    Tobias Nickel
    Participant

    Thank you for sharing your trailhead logistics plans, Brian! I have looked into the public transit and greyhound options as well. It all looks totally doable from Crescent City all the way to Red Bluff with stops in Arcata and Redding. It’s just those last 40 or 50 miles to the actual trailhead that are tricky. I don’t have a good solution yet, but will continue to reach out to friends, friends of friends and fellow PCTA volunteers/ trail angels in the area to see if I can pay someone to help me out and drive me the last bit. I’m pretty set on hiking northbound and starting at Ides Cove trailhead. Good luck!

    #471

    Brad Marston
    Participant

    Starting to think about a 2017 BFT hike. It seems to me that it might be easier to hitch a ride out of Ides Cove (by going SoBo on the trail) rather than starting there. Are there enough day or short backpack hikers at the trailhead to make that feasible? Thanks.

    #472

    Mary Kwart
    Participant

    When we drove to the Ides Cove Trailhead all we saw were logging trucks. I did meet a couple coming back to the trailhead as I was heading out, but trailhead users seem to be very sparse. I saw no one else on the trail for days after that until I hit the road on the other side of the Yolla Bollys. Your best bet would be to pay someone to pick you up at the trailhead if you want to go southbound. I don’t know of any local trail angels but you could send out feelers to PCT trail angels to see if any of them could do this.
    –Mary “Fireweed”

    #473

    Brad Marston
    Participant

    Thanks Mary! That’s good to know. — Brad

    #475

    Brad Marston
    Participant

    I try to use public transportation as much as possible getting to and from trailheads. Trinity Transit, a bus service run by Trinity County, looks like it could be very useful to section hikers. Weaverville, Hayfork, Redding, and Eureka and Arcata are among the cities that they serve.

    #477

    Conifermann
    Keymaster

    Melissa Spencer and Brett Tucker got an Uber driver from Chico. I think that worked out well for them, though the driver did not realize how far the drive was!

    #497

    Brad Marston
    Participant

    Interesting idea to use Uber. Chico doesn’t seem to be one of their cities though? It looks like Sacramento is the closest:

    https://www.uber.com/cities/sacramento

    #498

    Brian Tanzman
    Participant

    I actually don’t think it worked too well for them. Blisterfree did tell me that they took an Uber from Chico but the driver freaked out later on when she lost signal, etc and I believe gave up about 12 miles from the trailhead and they had to guess on a price. Although, given how remote the trailhead is, 12 miles away isn’t too bad. He thought you could probably convince a regular taxi driver to be more brave but probably a lot more expensive.

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